Friday, April 18, 2014
PLACERVILLE, CALIFORNIA
99 CENTS

Sheriff D’Agostini and his strange concept of federalism

EDITOR: Methinks the title of “Sheriff” has gone to D’Agostini’s head. First, he took it upon himself to tell Vice President Biden that he, D’Agostini, would not enforce any gun laws he considered “illegal,” leaving open the question: Does D’Agostini have a degree in constitutional law?

Now, our esteemed Sheriff has notified the U.S. Forest Service that his own interpretation of Federal statutes allows him to unilaterally abrogate U.S. Government regulations and enforce those that he deems worthy of enforcing. This mind-boggling assumption once again raises the point: Did D’Agostini go to the “Fly by Night” law school favored by Tea Partyers?

As I pointed out in an earlier critique of D’Agostini’s apperance at the EDC Democratic Women’s Club meeting on gun laws, the good Sheriff reminded me of a strutting Rod Steiger in the movie “In the Heat of the Night”and not of a humble servant of the people — a ‘my way or the highway’ type, the quintessential authoritarian. It’s time for John D’Agostini to consider changing his name to Napoleon Bonaparte D’Agostini — or “Il Duce” for short.

JOHN GARON

Placerville

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | 45 comments

  • Karen WoodrellJuly 01, 2013 - 3:53 pm

    Well, JG, youthinks wrong. Sheriff D'Agostini honors his title by acting within county, state and federal laws (which you should review, apparently) to safeguard his constituency with no documented strutting. I'll vote for him again.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • @dawgGoodieJuly 01, 2013 - 7:43 pm

    "...the good Sheriff reminded me of a strutting Rod Steiger in the movie “In the Heat of the Night” ". Solid, objective content. Thanks, JG.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • JimBoJuly 01, 2013 - 7:56 pm

    Sheriff John D'Agostini along with a few other California Sheriffs is standing up for local citizens Constitutional rights. I'm 100% behind the Sheriff on this.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Phil VeerkampJuly 01, 2013 - 8:45 pm

    John Garon seemingly restricts the domain of Constitutional protections to those who possess, "a degree in constitutional law." John Garon implies that only those who possess, " a degree in constitutional law" may assert Constitutional protection from the overreach of the U.S. Government. John Garon wishes to subordinate 99.99% of the American people to the .01% who possess, " a degree in constitutional law." Pi$$ off, John.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • James E.July 01, 2013 - 9:24 pm

    Someone correct me if I'm wrong (a real lawyer preferred), but lawyers don't get degrees in Constitutional Law. They take a course in Constitutional Law (Con Law) as part of their three years in law school. After some experience they may be asked by a school to teach Constitutional Law or Criminal Law or Contracts, etc., etc., wherein, for example they would be called a Professor of Constitutional Law. Ergo, no one possesses a degree in Constitutional Law (although there are law degrees at the Masters and PhD levels, so we need a lawyer to educate us for these higher levels).

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • R J CarterJuly 02, 2013 - 7:27 am

    Cut the cr*p Garon,...Everybody knows the Sheriff is pro 2nd Amendment and this is all just about your dislike of guns.....Since elected, John D’Agostini has proven himself to be a Sheriff of the people, by the people, and for the people...As long as I've lived here he's been the only Sheriff I've ever seen that has been openly endorsed by all segments of society even those that typically don't like or trust cops..Why?..Because even they can recognize him as ray of hope against the crooked cops and GOB's that have been ruining this County for years.....Just another letter to the Editor in which John Garon is happy to show he doesn't know his A-hol* from his elbow....

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • cookie65July 03, 2013 - 5:50 am

    Worse than a whiny sniveling little girl. What it must be like to be a 60 something 2 year old.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Chuck HollandJuly 03, 2013 - 5:59 am

    R J, You took the words right out of my mouth. Thank You.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Paddy O'furnitureJuly 03, 2013 - 7:22 am

    To the Groaner; you lefties have been rubbing obomba's victory in the noses of conservatives, saying things like "you lost, obomba's our man, deal with it". Well, D'agostini won, and he's doing what he was elected to do. Shut your pie hole and deal with it. ............................................ Anyone who has been up enjoying our forests and been harassed by Ken Marcus knows why the sheriff did what he did. Bravo sheriff!

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • cookie65July 03, 2013 - 7:37 am

    Adolescents like garon are easily confused, imagine switching his Velcro laced tennis shoes with string laced ones when he isn't looking. He would need to call social services for assistance. He has convinced himself that the adults of El Dorado county are somehow comparable to the endless supply of government dependent lemmings who elect nanny state dictators like obama and biden. garon is the type that would have had this country stuck under the union jack because that is what the king wanted. He cannot deal with the fact that the Constitution and the Bill of Rights are not subject to some community agitator trained in Marxists theology who is nothing more than a bug smear on the windshield of this Country. So garon what happened to the leftists assault on the 2nd Amendment? Where did it go? How come the dims couldn't get it out of the senate? Move to Chicago they have lots of gun control.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • DB SmithJuly 03, 2013 - 8:03 am

    Cookie, the Velcro vs. laced tennies for the Groaner is too funny. It will sustain me until I return from town.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • cookie65July 03, 2013 - 8:43 am

    DB, if there were no government agency to assist him would probably tie his two shoes together like a pair of shoes from Kmart. When he fell down and hurt himself he would sue because the shoes came without a warning label. Knowing what has gone terribly wrong in this great country is as simple as reading a letter to the editor from people like garon.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • El Dorado WatchdogJuly 03, 2013 - 11:27 am

    I Support John D’Agostini's concept of supporting the U.S. Constitution. However, it has come to my attention that the EDSO Deputies do not follow the U.S. Constitution when kicking in doors of Mr. Reed without warrants in the Georgetown neighborhood of D’Agostini's friends.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • MericaJuly 03, 2013 - 12:31 pm

    JOHN GARON Please move back to France and go tell those people how to live and leave our county.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • MorrisJuly 03, 2013 - 2:15 pm

    I have no dogs in this hunt (not want any) but have a few observations. 1. No matter points pro or con, the appropriate manner in addressing 'D'Agostini' is Sheriff D'Agostini. As our duly elected Sheriff, he deserves both the title and respect of proper assessment. 2. The role of the Sheriff is to uphold the rule of law; not interpret it. To do so sets a very dangerous precedent and opens a door for abuse and subjective interpretation and enforcement. (Note that this statement is made as a reference to the position itself: not Sheriff D'Agostini) On a lighter note, it has for some time perplexed me as to where I had seen the Sheriff before. He looked so familiar. Then it hit me: The large hair. Those eyes. 'Respect My AUTH-OR-A-TIE!!' The resemblance is uncanny. Erie....

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • JoeJuly 03, 2013 - 5:11 pm

    SUPPORT The El Dorado County Sheriff John D'Agostini Anyone that has had issues with Officer Ken Marcus of the USFS or any other USFS LEO that has acted Unprofessionally or Otherwise! Really needs to contact Mr. Scott Harris Regional Special Agent in Charge. Mr. Scott Harris Regional Special Agent in Charge United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service 1323 Club Drive Vallejo, Ca. 94592 707.562.8737 _____________________________________________________________________ Also please send a copy to Sheriff D'Agostini - dagostinij@edso.org If the incident that your reporting ONLY Happened in El Dorado County **Otherwise the Sheriff of the county in which the incident happened** ______________________________________________________________________ Mr Scott Harris needs to know of these violations as he said to Sheriff D'Agostini last Wednesday June 26th When he eluded it was the first he ever heard of this. ** Which is highly contested amongst citizens of El Dorado county suggesting Mr. Harris was aware too.** see news report at: www . sacbee . com/2013/06/27/5530046/el-dorado-county-sheriff-curtails.html

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Phil VeerkampJuly 03, 2013 - 6:32 pm

    LINK - El Dorado County sheriff curtails Forest Service officers' authority to enforce state laws

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • cookie65July 03, 2013 - 6:23 pm

    I wonder how many boxes of crayons garon goes thru writing letters to the editor every month.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • 1036-FrankJuly 03, 2013 - 8:40 pm

    The last anyone heard from this loon he was accusing the Tea Party of all kinds of blatant invented violent actions. Now he is angry that a federal agency is being stripped of state powers which most here support. If the Sheriff is making him mad he is doing his job very well and he will gain support.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Jack MehoffJuly 03, 2013 - 8:53 pm

    Ken Marcus is the problem in the forest. google him Ken Marcus usfs....

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • James E.July 03, 2013 - 9:00 pm

    Phil, my three little blue pills (along with a bunch of others) are not the medium sized blue pill that you seem to know a lot about. Take three of the medium sized blue pills at one time and you are likely to fall over dead. So, be careful out there.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • G BarnettJuly 03, 2013 - 9:31 pm

    Since the special agent in charge is part of the problem, I would also cc any correspondence to the Regional Forster in Vallejo as well as Congressman McClintock's office and Sen. Feinstein's and Boxer's office.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Phil VeerkampJuly 03, 2013 - 9:32 pm

    Colonel, thanks for the . . . uh . . . "heads up".

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Ken SteersJuly 04, 2013 - 10:02 am

    So the real question is whether you take the "blue pill" or the "Red pill"? The blue pill and its opposite, the red pill, are pop culture symbols representing the choice between the blissful ignorance of illusion (blue) and embracing the sometimes painful truth of reality (red).

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • cookie65July 04, 2013 - 10:43 am

    Jay Giles says, "I got the blues, the reds and the pinks, one thing for sure.... love stinks. Mick Jagger says, "A little yellow pill called mommy's little helper".

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Jim RiordanJuly 04, 2013 - 10:56 am

    RJ, Cookie, Paddy and Chuck, with you 100% . . Notice 'ole Garon heard our Sheriff at the WOMENS' democratic club . . perhaps where he fits in best.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Phil VeerkampJuly 04, 2013 - 11:43 am

    HAPPY 4th TO . . . uh . . . oh well . . . EVERYBODY! "...our lives, our fortunes, our sacred honor..." It was a glorious morning. The sun was shining and the wind was from the southeast. Up especially early, a tall, bony, redheaded young Virginian found time to buy a new thermometer, for which he paid three pounds, fifteen shillings. He also bought gloves for Martha, his wife, who was ill at home. Thomas Jefferson arrived early at the statehouse. The temperature was 72.5: and the horseflies weren't nearly so bad at that hour. It was a lovely room, very large, with gleaming white walls. The chairs were comfortable. Facing the single door were two brass fireplaces, but they would not be used today. The moment the door was shut, and it was always kept locked, the room became an oven. The tall windows were shut, so that loud quarreling voices could not be heard by passersby. Small openings atop the windows allowed a slight stir of air, and also a large number of horseflies. Jefferson records that "the horseflies were dexterous in finding necks, and the silk of stocking was as nothing to them." All discussion was punctuated by the slap of hands on necks. On the wall at the back, facing the President's desk, was a panoply--consisting of a drum, swords, and banners seized from Fort Ticonderoga the previous year. Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold had captured the place, shouting that they were taking it "in the name if the Great Jehovah and the Continental Congress!" Now Congress got to work, promptly taking up an emergency measure about which there was discussion but no dissension. "Resolved: That an application be made to the Committee of Safety of Pennsylvania for a supply of flints for the troops at New York." Then Congress transformed itself into a committee of the whole, The Declaration of Independence was read aloud once more, and debate resumed. Though Jefferson was the best writer of all of them, he had been somewhat verbose. Congress hacked the excess away. They did a good job, as a side-by-side comparison of the rough draft and the final text shows. They cut the phrase "by a self-assumed power." "Climb" was replaced by "must read," then "must" was eliminated, then the whole sentence, and soon the whole paragraph was cut. Jefferson groaned as they continued what he later called "their depredations." "Inherent and inalienable rights" came out "certain unalienable rights," and to this day no one knows who suggested the elegant change. A total of 86 alterations were made. Almost 500 words were eliminated, leaving 1,337. At last, after three days of wrangling, the document was put to a vote. Here in this hall Patrick Henry had once thundered: "I am no longer a Virginian, Sir, but an American." But today the loud, sometimes bitter argument stilled, and without fanfare the vote was taken from north to south by colonies, as was the custom. On July 4, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was adopted. There were no trumpets blown. No one stood on his chair and cheered. The afternoon was waning and Congress had no thought of delaying the full calendar of routine business on its hands. For several hours they worked on many other problems before adjourning for the day. Much to lose What kind of men were the 56 signers who adopted the Declaration of Independence and who, by their signing, committed an act of treason against the Crown? To each of you the names Franklin, Adams, Hancock, and Jefferson are almost as familiar as household words. Most of us, however, know nothing of the other signers. Who were they? What happened to them? I imagine that many of you are somewhat surprised at the names not there: George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Patrick Henry. All were elsewhere. Ben Franklin was the only really old man. Eighteen were under 40; three were in their 20s. Of the 56, almost half--24--were judges and lawyers. Eleven were merchants, 9 were land-owners and farmers, and the remaining 12 were doctors, ministers, and politicians. With only a few exceptions, such as Samuel Adams of Massachusetts, these were men of substantial property. All but two had families. The vast majority were men of education and standing in their communities. They had economic security as few men had in the 18th century. Each had more to lose from revolution than he had to gain by it. John Hancock, one of the richest men in America, already had a price of 500 pounds on his head. He signed in enormous letter so "that his Majesty could now read his name without glasses and could now double the reward." Ben Franklin wryly noted: "Indeed we must all hang together, otherwise we shall most assuredly hang separately." Fat Benjamin Harrison of Virginia told tiny Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts: "With me it will all be over in a minute, but you, you will be dancing on air an hour after I am gone." These men knew what they risked. The penalty for treason was death by hanging. And remember: a great British fleet was already at anchor in New York Harbor. They were sober men. There were no dreamy-eyed intellectuals or draft card burners here. They were far from hot-eyed fanatics, yammering for an explosion. They simply asked for the status quo. It was change they resisted. It was equality with the mother country they desired. It was taxation with representation they sought. They were all conservatives, yet they rebelled. It was principle, not property, that had brought these men to Philadelphia. Two of them became presidents of the United States. Seven of them became state governors. One died in office as vice president of the United States. Several would go on to be U.S. Senators. One, the richest man in America, in 1828 founded the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. One, a delegate from Philadelphia, was the only real poet, musician and philosopher of the signers (it was he, Francis Hopkinson--not Betsy Ross--who designed the United States flag). Richard Henry Lee, a delegate from Virginia, had introduced the resolution to adopt the Declaration of Independence in June of 1776. He was prophetic is his concluding remarks: "Why then sir, why do we longer delay? Why still deliberate? Let this happy day give birth to an American Republic. Let her arise not to devastate and to conquer but to reestablish the reign of peace and law. The eyes of Europe are fixed upon us. She demands of us a living example of freedom that may exhibit a contrast in the felicity of the citizen to the ever increasing tyranny which desolates her polluted shores. She invites us to prepare an asylum where the unhappy may find solace, and the persecuted repose. If we are not this day wanting in our duty, the names of the American legislators of 1776 will be placed by posterity at the side of all of those whose memory has been and ever will be dear to virtuous men and good citizens." Though the resolution was formally adopted July 4, it was not until July 8 that two of the states authorized their delegates to sign, and it was not until August 2 that the signers met at Philadelphia to actually put their names to the Declaration. William Ellery, delegate from Rhode Island, was curious to see the signers' faces as they committed this supreme act of personal courage. He saw some men sign quickly, "but in no face was he able to discern real fear." Stephen Hopkins, Ellery's colleague from Rhode Island, was a man past 60. As he signed with a shaking pen, he declared: "My hand trembles, but my heart does not." "Most glorious service" Even before the list was published, the British marked down every member of Congress suspected of having put his name to treason. All of them became the objects of vicious manhunts. Some were taken. Some, like Jefferson, had narrow escapes. All who had property or families near British strongholds suffered. Francis Lewis, New York delegate, saw his home plundered and his estates, in what is now Harlem, completely destroyed by British soldiers. Mrs. Lewis was captured and treated with great brutality. Though she was later exchanged for two British prisoners through the efforts of Congress, she died from the effects of her abuse. William Floyd, another New York delegate, was able to escape with his wife and children across Long Island Sound to Connecticut, where they lived as refugees without income for seven years. When they came home, they found a devastated ruin. Phillips Livingstone had all his great holdings in New York confiscated and his family driven out of their home. Livingstone died in 1778 still working in Congress for the cause. Louis Morris, the fourth New York delegate, saw all his timber, crops, and livestock taken. For seven years he was barred from his home and family. John Hart of Trenton, New Jersey, risked his life to return home to see his dying wife. Hessian soldiers rode after him, and he escaped in the woods. While his wife lay on her deathbed, the soldiers ruined his farm and wrecked his Homestead. Hart, 65, slept in caves and woods as he was hunted across the countryside. When at long last, emaciated by hardship, he was able to sneak home, he found his wife had already been buried, and his 13 children taken away. He never saw them again. He died a broken man in 1779, without ever finding his family. Dr. John Witherspoon, signer, was president of the College of New Jersey, later called Princeton. The British occupied the town of Princeton, and billeted troops in the college. They trampled and burned the finest college library in the country. Judge Richard Stockton, another New Jersey delegate signer, had rushed back to his estate in an effort to evacuate his wife and children. The family found refuge with friends, but a sympathizer betrayed them. Judge Stockton was pulled from bed in the night and brutally beaten by the arresting soldiers. Thrown into a common jail, he was deliberately starved. Congress finally arranged for Stockton's parole, but his health was ruined. The judge was released as an invalid, when he could no longer harm the British cause. He returned home to find his estate looted and did not live to see the triumph of the evolution. His family was forced to live off charity. Robert Morris, merchant prince of Philadelphia, delegate and signer, met Washington's appeals and pleas for money year after year. He made and raised arms and provisions which made it possible for Washington to cross the Delaware at Trenton. In the process he lost 150 ships at sea, bleeding his own fortune and credit almost dry. George Clymer, Pennsylvania signer, escaped with his family from their home, but their property was completely destroyed by the British in the Germantown and Brandywine campaigns. Dr. Benjamin Rush, also from Pennsylvania, was forced to flee to Maryland. As a heroic surgeon with the army, Rush had several narrow escapes. John Morton, a Tory in his views previous to the debate, lived in a strongly loyalist area of Pennsylvania. When he came out for independence, most of his neighbors and even some of his relatives ostracized him. He was a sensitive and troubled man, and many believed this action killed him. When he died in 1777, his last words to his tormentors were: "Tell them that they will live to see the hour when they shall acknowledge it [the signing] to have been the most glorious service that I rendered to my country." William Ellery, Rhode Island delegate, saw his property and home burned to the ground. Thomas Lynch, Jr., South Carolina delegate, had his health broken from privation and exposures while serving as a company commander in the military. His doctors ordered him to seek a cure in the West Indies and on the voyage He and his young bride were drowned at sea. Edward Rutledge, Arthur Middleton, and Thomas Heyward, Jr., the other three South Carolina signers, were taken by the British in the siege of Charleston. They were carried as prisoners of war to St. Augustine, Florida, where they were singled out for indignities. They were exchanged at the end of the war, the British in the meantime having completely devastated their large land holdings and estates. Thomas Nelson, signer of Virginia, was at the front in command of the Virginia military forces. With British General Charles Cornwallis in Yorktown, fire from 70 heavy American guns began to destroy Yorktown piece by piece. Lord Cornwallis and his staff moved their headquarters into Nelson's palatial home. While American cannonballs were making a shambles of the town, the house of Governor Nelson remained untouched. Nelson turned in rage to the American gunners and asked, "Why do you spare my home?" They replied, "Sir, out of respect to you." Nelson cried, "Give me the cannon!" and fired on his magnificent home himself, smashing it to bits. But Nelson's sacrifice was not quite over. He had raised $2 million for the Revolutionary cause by pledging his own estates. When the loans came due, a newer peacetime Congress refused to honor them, and Nelson's property was forfeited. He was never reimbursed. He died, impoverished, a few years later at the age of 50. Lives, fortunes, honor Of those 56 who signed the Declaration of Independence, nine died of wounds or hardships during the war. Five were captured and imprisoned, in each case with brutal treatment. Several lost wives, sons or entire families. One lost his 13 children. Two wives were brutally treated. All were at one time or another the victims of manhunts and driven from their homes. Twelve signers had their homes completely burned. Seventeen lost everything they owned. Yet not one defected or went back on his pledged word. Their honor, and the nation they sacrificed so much to create, is still intact. And, finally, there is the New Jersey signer, Abraham Clark. He gave two sons to the officer corps in the Revolutionary Army. They were captured and sent to the infamous British prison hulk afloat in New York harbor known as the hell ship "Jersey," where 11,000 American captives were to die. The younger Clarks were treated with a special brutality because of their father. One was put in solitary and given no food. With the end almost in sight, with the war almost won, no one could have blamed Abraham Clark for acceding to the British request when they offered him his sons' lives if he would recant and come out for the King and parliament. The utter despair in this man's heart, the anguish in his very soul, must reach out to each one of us down through 200 years with his answer: "No." The 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence proved by their every deed that they made no idle boast when they composed the most magnificent curtain line in history. "And for the support of this Declaration with a firm reliance on the protection of divine providence, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor." http://www.baxtercountyrepublicans.com/founding_fathers.html Thanks Rush's Dad

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Phil VeerkampJuly 04, 2013 - 11:43 am

    off

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • PNBJuly 04, 2013 - 1:28 pm

    Is John Garon the only educated man you have in El Dorado County? I have been staying here in your beautiful county and reading your local newspaper for awhile and I am afraid to say but other than John reading these comments people seem to be a little backwards and ignorant.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Jethro McSwiftJuly 04, 2013 - 2:47 pm

    PNB, I'm sooo ashamed of all these stupid people. Can we share a crock of possum and a jug and consider a plan of action? I'm glad somewon other that me sees th' problem.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • James E.July 04, 2013 - 2:10 pm

    PNB, there are citizens in El Dorado County who are forward and educated. Mr. Garon is one of those, however, who has the courage to put his thoughts into print (and who catches heck from the opposition for doing it). By the way, have I told you about Mr. Fred?

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Phil VeerkampJuly 04, 2013 - 2:26 pm

    James, what a blessing that PNB deigns to stay, " here in your beautiful county and reading your local newspaper". Are we, the unwashed, to seek enlightenment at PNB's feet. What are we to do? Does PNB offer this information for our own edification? Or is PNB actually one of those small people who attempts to stretch stature by feigning intellectual superiority? Oh my! I'm so confused . . .

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • PNBJuly 04, 2013 - 3:26 pm

    WOW Phil I am starting to get what James E. means. You people are just rude a$$holes who don't know how to have a conversation and be polite. Come to think of it I have noticed that a lot about rightwingers!

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • James E.July 04, 2013 - 3:28 pm

    Phil, I just hate it when someone says they are smarter than everyone else (how exactly would they know?). I doubt it if PNB is going hold any seminars to educate you, so please don't be confused over this.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • James E.July 04, 2013 - 3:30 pm

    ADDED: PNB was just expressing his/her opinion. A right granted all of us on this site.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • cookie65July 04, 2013 - 3:33 pm

    I am always fascinated with the leftists version of educated. Repeating all the nonsense you have been trained to believe is not difficult. We have all been exposed to your groupthink for decades. Understanding that we are not required to believe any of it requires the thing learned leftists don't possess, intellect. Arrogant ignorance is the only thing leftists have, also known as stupidity. I have a question, if you are entitled to the earnings of others, what are the people doing the earning entitled to?

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • James E.July 04, 2013 - 3:43 pm

    Cookie, you've known for a long time that I want all your money. I've previously indicated that I want you to put your money in a big black trash bag and leave it behind KFC in the weeds for me to pick up later. Please hurry, I need your money. to help pay my 2013 taxes, Federal, State, and County.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • James E.July 04, 2013 - 3:44 pm

    OK, a little humor. Cookie you can keep 10% of your money, but cough up the other 90%.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • cookie65July 04, 2013 - 3:46 pm

    The reason we have such a beautiful county is because of the lack of leftists to destroy it. Seek out a leftists utopia for something more suited to your advanced intellect. Two things to consider when traveling in and around a leftists utopia, don't be out after dark and don't carry cash.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • cookie65July 04, 2013 - 3:52 pm

    James, if you take other peoples money away from leftism what is left? It is the entire foundation and motivation of leftism/socialism/progressivism/communism. The reason clowns like PNB and Jethro are so easy to make fun of is because they really are clueless about what they have been trained to believe. They have swallowed the lie that government can make us all equal. They are useful idiots. Which, for the purposes of prosperity and being contributing members of society they are useless idiots. The only thing they have to offer is their willingness to trade everyone's freedom for their handout.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • James E.July 04, 2013 - 3:56 pm

    OK, I've caused enough spirited debate, be back later.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • cookie65July 04, 2013 - 4:24 pm

    Don't like the question James? Let me ask it another way, What does leftism create? Where is the wealth that comes from leftism? Where is the prosperity that comes from leftism? Where is the freedom that comes from leftism? Where are the jobs that come from leftism? Where is the upward mobility that comes from leftism? Where is the escape from poverty that comes from leftism? Let me help the school of fish, lockstep, groupthink, koolaid drinkin, -the government will do for me what I won't do for myself-, lemmings.... leftism is the opposite of prosperity because it is promoted based on the idea that wealth is spread by confiscating more of it, when in fact wealth is spread by creating more of it. Leftism opposes the creation of wealth. Leftism opposes prosperity.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Walking TallJuly 07, 2013 - 8:01 am

    Work within the system and use the chain of command to solve issues with personnel, don't strip the Deputies of the only back-up that they have within the forested area of our county. Not a wise move to take on the Federal Government on issues of security and enforcement, work within the system again and the needed results will be met. Brotherhood of Law Enforcement is that of support and backup when needed and the combined resources to achieve a common goal; the protection of the citizens. This is not one of "I am large and in charge so listen only to me", we elected a man to lead not follow and be swayed by others.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Walking TallJuly 07, 2013 - 8:15 am

    Rumors have it that our Sheriff wants to give a radio contract to Ol Sheriff Hal Barker's new CAO position at a rival company. The current radio/communications vendor has provided excellent service to this county for years and is not in need of changing. The real purpose here is to give another quid pro quo to the GOB mentality of scratch my back politics. We certainly hope that the Sheriff can put the "I owe you" away as he has already give the Ol Sheriff a job and listens to his every word and it is not helping him run the department. Lead, Follow or get out of the Way.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Michael HamersleyJuly 13, 2013 - 5:45 pm

    Dear Mr. Garon, Sheriff D'Agostini is the best thing to happen to Corruption County in a very, very, long time. Unlike previous Good Ole Boy sheriff's, there is absolutely no doubt where Sheriff D'Agostini's ultimate allegiance lies--in protecting the security, liberty, and freedom of the WE THE PEOPLE who reside in EDC. For the record, I am a lawyer (oh yeah, and a registered Democrat). I received my formal legal training and J.D. degree from Georgetown University Law Center--which has long employed some of the Nation's preeminent constitutional law scholars. Mr. Garon, your assertion that Sheriff D'Agostini's views on Federalism and the Bill of Rights are unsound or that he is unqualified to speak on such matters simply becuase he is not a consitutional law scholar is not correct. Sheriff D'Agostini got it absolutely right on this one.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
.

News

Goodbye LUPPU, hello LRPU

By Chris Daley | From Page: A1, 4 Comments

 
Past due state taxes bring arrest

By Cole Mayer | From Page: A1, 9 Comments

 
Sanford trial: Prosecution, defense rest

By Cole Mayer | From Page: A1 | Gallery

Woman, dog back from Oso

By Wendy Schultz | From Page: A1, 9 Comments | Gallery

 
 
 
DA candidate to remain on ballot

By Dawn Hodson | From Page: A9

Dog talk with Uncle Matty: Benji and the Bickersons

By Matthew Margolis | From Page: A10

 
CPCSD seat unfilled

By Dawn Hodson | From Page: A14, 1 Comment

Lew Uhler backs Ranalli

By News Release | From Page: A14, 6 Comments

 
.

Letters

District 4 candidate

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A7, 27 Comments

 
Open meetings

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A7, 6 Comments

Volunteers and homeless camps

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A7, 76 Comments

 
Bicycle events and traffic control

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A7, 7 Comments

Evacuation

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A7, 6 Comments

 
.

Sports

Savannah Stephens can swing the bat

By Jerry Heinzer | From Page: A11 | Gallery

 
King of the West roars into Placerville

By Gary Thomas | From Page: A11

First and goal: Bunt etiquette

By Mike Bush | From Page: A11

 
Oak Ridge suffers tough 2-1 setback

By Mike Bush | From Page: A11

Jennings wins national title

By Democrat Staff | From Page: A11, 1 Comment | Gallery

 
Roundup: April 17, 2014

By Democrat Staff | From Page: A12 | Gallery

.

Prospecting

Plantastic sale this Saturday

By Dawn Hodson | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Spring art brightens government center

By Democrat Staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

Things to do: April 18, 2014

By Democrat Calendar | From Page: B2

 
Time out: A grand time at Grand China

By Earle Camembert | From Page: B3 | Gallery

Temple Kol Shalom hosts Passover Seder

By News Release | From Page: B3

 
Student art featured for Third Saturday

By News Release | From Page: B3

Promenade in high style

By Historic Old Sacramento | From Page: B4

 
Sac State Presents ‘Gypsy’

By California State Unversity, Sacramento | From Page: B4

Friday nights are engaging at the de Young

By Fine Arts | From Page: B5

 
Hats On For the Kids raises money for children

By Democrat Staff | From Page: B6

See what is inside the vault

By Center For Sacramento History | From Page: B6

 
Eggstravaganza

By Fairytale Town | From Page: B6

Museum presents ‘Diesel Days’

By California State Railroad Museum | From Page: B7

 
Gallery tips a hat to Dr. Seuss

By Democrat Staff | From Page: B7

Engagement: Adam Frega and Wednesday Bienusa

By Democrat Staff | From Page: B8

 
Duty: Air Force Airman Brian Polk

By Democrat Staff | From Page: B8

Cal Stage presents a season of challenging productions

By California Stage | From Page: B8

 
Duty: Army Pfc. Kyle W. Beasy

By Democrat Staff | From Page: B8

KVIE calls for artists

By Kvie | From Page: B9

 
A Couple of Blaguards tell tales

By Harris Center for the Arts | From Page: B9

America’s ClayFest II celebrates a rich history

By Blue Line Arts | From Page: B14

 
Fine Arts Museums feature two shows

By Fine Arts | From Page: B15

See wildflowers on train ride

By Railtown | From Page: B15

 
Easter at Northstar is family friendly

By Northstar California | From Page: B15

.

Essentials

Crime Log: March 28-30

By Cole Mayer | From Page: A2

 
.

Obituaries

Frederick Wilbur Heymann

By Contributor | From Page: A2

 
Arthur W. Cornell

By Contributor | From Page: A2

Frank “Bud” Kraus Jr.

By Contributor | From Page: A2

 
Roy Cluness Chaix

By Contributor | From Page: A2

.

Real Estate

Faster sales with spring staging

By Ken Calhoon | From Page: HS4

 
Coldwell Banker outsells the competition

Press Release | From Page: HS7

Handsome Redmond suits modern families

Press Release | From Page: HS11

 
Growing your own

By Marni Jameson | From Page: HS14

 
Fraud workshop scheduled

Press Release | From Page: HS21

HCD launches assistance program

Press Release | From Page: HS22, 1 Comment

 
EZ Mortgages Inc. opens Placerville office

By News Release | From Page: HS22, 2 Comments

.

Comics

Sudoku

By Contributor | From Page: A13

 
Speed Bump

By Contributor | From Page: A13

Working It Out

By Contributor | From Page: A13

 
Shoe

By Contributor | From Page: A13

Rubes

By Contributor | From Page: A13

 
Tundra

By Contributor | From Page: A13

TV Listings

By Contributor | From Page: A13

 
New York Times Crossword

By Contributor | From Page: A14

Horoscope, Sunday, April 20, 2014

By Contributor | From Page: A14

 
Horoscope, Saturday, April 19, 2014

By Contributor | From Page: A14

Horoscope, Friday, April 18, 2104

By Contributor | From Page: A14

 
.

Home Source

Faster sales with spring staging

By Ken Calhoon | From Page: HS4

Coldwell Banker outsells the competition

Press Release | From Page: HS7

Handsome Redmond suits modern families

Press Release | From Page: HS11

Growing your own

By Marni Jameson | From Page: HS14

Fraud workshop scheduled

Press Release | From Page: HS21

HCD launches assistance program

Press Release | From Page: HS22, 1 Comment

EZ Mortgages Inc. opens Placerville office

By News Release | From Page: HS22, 2 Comments