Monday, April 21, 2014
PLACERVILLE, CALIFORNIA
99 CENTS

Super Wi-Fi proposal

EDITOR:

A recent Mountain Democrat editorial discussed “Super Wi-Fi.” It quoted a Washington Post article that stated “The federal government wants to create Super Wi-Fi networks across the nation.” That leaves the impression the feds will build and operate networks for computers and cell phones to use free of charge. That is not what the FCC is proposing.

Instead the FCC is proposing the use of certain airwave frequencies without a license. Under the old analog TV system there was “white space” left between the frequencies used by each TV channel. The “white space” was wasted spectrum but was needed to prevent interference between adjacent channels. The newer digital TV system uses the airwave spectrum more precisely and this “white space” is no longer needed. Over a decade ago the FCC began to propose the use of these frequencies as unlicensed spectrum.

Setting aside frequencies for unlicensed use is nothing new. Most people probably have at least one device that uses unlicensed frequencies. Examples are CB radios, walkie-talkies, Wi-Fi computer routers, cordless phones, microwave ovens, Bluetooth headsets, etc. In recent years there have been companies that use certain unlicensed frequencies to provide wireless Internet in rural areas.

What is different is that the proposed frequencies are very good at going long distances and getting through trees and buildings. This would be of great advantage in providing wireless Internet in rural, wooded areas.

As pointed out in the editorial, large telecommunications companies want the FCC to instead auction off the spectrum for licensed use. You would then pay them to use it. They have a considerable amount of political clout. What has prevented this from happening so far is that other companies such as Google and Microsoft have been lobbying to have the frequencies unlicensed. Microsoft of course has it’s own motives. It wants an FCC contract to manage the databases that would be like airwave traffic controllers to avoid interference.

So what we have is a bunch of goliaths fighting another bunch of goliaths. Who will win is uncertain.

It might be best to hang onto that old TV antenna. Who knows, in a few years maybe you can point it to a local Super Wi-Fi hotspot miles away and get high-speed Internet. But someone will have to build that hot spot and provide a connection to the Internet.

In the meantime, don’t expect the feds to come in and put up a bunch of towers to provide free Super Wi-Fi.

TOM DEVILLE
Pollock Pines

Letters to the Editor

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Discussion | 39 comments

  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 15, 2013 - 7:37 pm

    Thank you, Tom. That was very informative. But be prepared for "incoming". It just seems to happen. No good deed (information) goes unpunished.

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  • DarrinFebruary 19, 2013 - 7:35 pm

    NC

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  • EvelynFebruary 12, 2014 - 7:21 pm

    Former Microsoft Canada President: Wifi in Schools is a Potential Health Hazard - HERE

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 12, 2014 - 7:43 pm

    Evelyn, from your link: "On Wednesday the American Academy of Environmental Medicine announced that medical doctors are treating patients who have fallen ill from school wireless systems. " ~~~ Back in the '50s & 60s we didn't have it so easy. When unprepared for a test we had to go to the nurse and perform convincingly and hope to convince that we were sick and then hope that Mom would come to the rescue. . . . come to think of it I have a WiFi router in my home today . . . hmmm . . . how can I work this angle? . . . hmm . . .

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 12, 2014 - 7:47 pm

    . . . prepare release forms for guests . . .

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 12, 2014 - 7:50 pm

    . . . prepare class action against Samsung, Soney et al over the sickening effects emanating from smart TVs, cell phones . . .

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  • EvelynFebruary 12, 2014 - 7:54 pm

    I've got it . . . the former President of Microsoft Canada is a CONSPIRACY THEORIST.

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 12, 2014 - 8:01 pm

    Perhaps. Or the greater possibility, "they" have attached a super secret device to school WiFi systems to deliberately and sadistically sicken children. The school specific nature of this sickness points in this direction. The VAST general public is not bothered. Even the little children are not bothered by the home WiFi. It must be some super secret selective gizmo that is specific to school WiFi and leaves the rest of the planet alone.

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 12, 2014 - 8:11 pm

    . . . or . . . Frank Clegg is a kookburger . . . Is that even possible? . . . Can smart accomplished people be kookburgers? .. . . . seems more likely than a selective WiFi that targets school children and ignores the rest of us . . . HUGE PUZZLE!

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 12, 2014 - 8:14 pm

    . . . avoid hotels, motels and Starbucks? . . . I'm feeling ill . . .

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  • EvelynFebruary 12, 2014 - 8:22 pm

    Consider the rapidly developing bodies of children as compared to adults.

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  • EvelynFebruary 12, 2014 - 8:25 pm

    01/24/2014 - "UCLA Study: Cellphones & Children's Headaches" - HERE

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  • EvelynFebruary 12, 2014 - 8:27 pm

    . . . Consider the presentations of Dr. Martin Pall (Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry and Basic Chemical Sciences at Washington State University) and others before solidifying your layman's conclusions.

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 12, 2014 - 11:19 pm

    Evelyn, do you have any solidified "layman's" conclusions of your own? You seem to have solidified your "layman's" conclusion that Monsanto is a non-source. ~~~ not from Monsanto (excuse the tangent) ~~~> LINK - Myth of the Week 2002 - "Glyphosate is the Agent Orange of our time"

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 12, 2014 - 8:26 pm

    . . . considering . . . . considering . . . children spend MORE time at home exposed to home WiFi . . . conclusion: "they" have implanted sadistic sickening devices in school WiFi

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  • EvelynFebruary 12, 2014 - 8:30 pm

    The True Face of 21st Century Learning How education became a tool for corporate profits: HERE

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  • EvelynFebruary 12, 2014 - 8:31 pm

    UK Expert Report: In-depth analysis of health issues resulting from the use of WiFi in schools - HERE

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  • EvelynFebruary 12, 2014 - 8:35 pm

    Cumulative exposure - HERE: "At school, a set of wirelessly connected computers in a classroom is known to result in exposures much higher than one computer being used alone. The radiation level has been found to be equivalent to being in the main beam of a mobile phone mast (which official guidelines state should not fall on school grounds without the consent of parents and the school). In 2007 a BBC Panorama programme found that the readings next to a classroom laptop showed radiation at double the level experienced only 100 metres from a mobile phone mast. This exposure from wi-fi is additional to mobile phones, cordless DECT phones and bluetooth used around the children in schools."

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  • EvelynFebruary 12, 2014 - 8:38 pm

    Formative exposure - HERE: "This exposure generally starts young and continues throughout children's lives. Children are now being exposed to wireless products from a very early age and often throughout their developing childhood and teenage years. This is experimental - no-one has any idea of the cumulative effect of such long-term exposure starting at such a formative age. We know from the scientific studies relating to mobile phones that children are more vulnerable to this type of radiation, absorbing more radiation than adults through their thinner skulls."

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 12, 2014 - 8:48 pm

    EVELYN, the vast majority of exposure is outside schools. Point to the data indicating an epidemic of children, adults . . . ANYBODY conclusively sickened by WiFi. WHERE ARE THE VICTIMS??? HUNDREDS AND HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS OF PEOPLE (and children) are exposed to outside schools. There must be reputable data somewhere on WiFi syndrome. What are the numbers?

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  • EvelynFebruary 12, 2014 - 8:51 pm

    Phil: Do some research.

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  • EvelynFebruary 12, 2014 - 8:58 pm

    THIS (The Radiation Poisoning Of America) is my last posting on the subject. You now have three choices: (1) Read the articles I have posted. (2) Don't read any of them. (3) Find material that suits your position. The best sources will be Wi-Fi manufacturers & distributors (similar to referencing Monsanto for GMO studies.)

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 12, 2014 - 9:16 pm

    OK ~~~ LINK - EMF and HEALTH

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  • James E.February 12, 2014 - 9:38 pm

    I feel so ashamed as I haven't given even one thought to WiFi radiation. I am so behind the times.

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 12, 2014 - 9:45 pm

    That's good, James. At our age we have few thoughts to spare. Continue to not think about WiFi EMFs. . . . You'll be just fine . . . but your dogs may be at risk . . . uh . . . perhaps . . .. go back to dial-up . . . for the pooches

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  • James E.February 12, 2014 - 9:51 pm

    My dogberts do howl sometimes. It could be WiFi radiation, but more usually when my wife returns home about a tough day/night driving in the rain.

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  • James E.February 12, 2014 - 9:52 pm

    Could WiFi radiation have caused me to be a Democrat?

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 12, 2014 - 11:07 pm

    James, your democrat . . . uh . . . "condition" preceded Wi-Fi by decades. Please, you muddy the waters.

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  • EvelynMarch 06, 2014 - 6:56 pm

    Insurance firm, Swiss Re, warns of large losses from “unforeseen consequences” of wireless technologies - HERE

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  • Phil VeerkampMarch 06, 2014 - 7:19 pm

    AMAZIN' . . . ABSOLUTELY F'ING AMAZIN' . . . Evelyn, is there even ONE conspiracy kook claptrap site that you do not subscribe to? Smart meters??? really????

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  • EvelynMarch 06, 2014 - 7:32 pm

    I only do conspiracy clap-trap. The sane stuff I leave for others. But do you think reinsurer Swiss Re (here) has some ulterior motive for making this assessment?

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  • EvelynMarch 06, 2014 - 7:35 pm

    Swiss Re SONAR Emerging risk insights (report) - HERE

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  • EvelynMarch 06, 2014 - 7:42 pm

    (From the above Report) - The majority of topics were rated by Swiss Re as being of medium impact for the insurance industry. With regard to time frame, most topics were assessed as being rather imminent – with the exception of four Casualty-related topics which are expected to manifest only in the more distant future. The topics “prolonged power blackout“, “run-away inflation and surging bond yields“ and “big data“ were assessed as being of highest concern as they could have a high impact on the entire insurance industry and might occur within a short period of time. Further topics assessed as potentially having a high impact are three casualty topics; these are characterised by their long latency periods: “endocrine disrupting chemicals“, “unforeseen consequences of nanotechnology“ and “unforeseen consequences of electromagnetic fields“.

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  • Phil VeerkampMarch 06, 2014 - 8:15 pm

    I am virtually certain (99.999% certain) that the Swiss have a re-insurance actuary filed away somewhere in case Bill Gates, the Koch Brothers, Putin or MSNBC wishes to insure against damages from an invasion from Alfa Centauri. But at a gut level I suspect zero to few LOWYERS are sniffing out Alfa Centauri threats. On the other hand there is a BOATLOAD OF MONEY awaiting the first LOWYER capable of "ALAR-ing" cellphones. LOWYERS are the REAL threat.

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  • Phil VeerkampMarch 06, 2014 - 8:21 pm

    . . . put another way - The risks associated with the ELIMINATION of electro magnetic fields (cell phones/WIFI) is thousands of times higher than continued use of WIFI - hurricanes - fire - earthquake - auto accident - NO WIFI??? How many lives have been SAVED?

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  • EvelynMarch 07, 2014 - 5:56 am

    Phil: That insurers assess the risks of wi-fi does not equate to arguing for the abolition of wi-fi any more than automobile insurance implies arguing for the abolition of the automobile. It simply means there are certain attendant risks. You may keep your wi-fi AND your automobile!!! Actuarial scientists calculate risk for all sorts of ordinary things, smoking being one of thousands. You name it and it's been assessed.

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  • EvelynMarch 07, 2014 - 6:16 am

    A COMMON RISK CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM FOR THE ACTUARIAL PROFESSION - HERE

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  • EvelynMarch 07, 2014 - 6:36 am

    HERE: Swiss Reinsurance Company Ltd ... is the world’s second-largest reinsurer. ... Swiss Re operates in more than 25 countries. Swiss Re was ranked 127th in Forbes 2000 Global leading companies & 334th in Fortune Global 500 in 2013.

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  • EvelynMarch 07, 2014 - 6:55 am

    WiFi and Concerns over Risks to Health - HERE: "What we do know very clearly from very substantial research, is that body tissues do respond to electromagnetic fields at very low levels indeed. We know that the response appears to be windowed by frequency and power (ie the response is nonlinear, and specific ranges of frequency and power elicit greater response that those above and below these ranges). We know that the effect is cumulative rather than purely instantaneous, and that cascade effects, from gene expression to protein modification, to cellular ion transport are all affected. ... The assertion that there is no scientific evidence for microwave fields affecting living organisms at the levels experienced in highly modified modern electromagnetic environments is plainly untrue." (emphasis in the original)

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