Wednesday, April 23, 2014
PLACERVILLE, CALIFORNIA
99 CENTS

E.U. abuzz over nicotine-derived insecticide

By
From page A4 | March 15, 2013 | Leave Comment

The effect of nicotine-derived insecticides on the noble honey bee has been much in the news of late.

Beekeepers and environmentalists accuse the neonicotinoid class of insecticide compounds of contributing to bee colony collapse. They praised a recent European Union proposal to ban three specific compounds: Imidacloprid, Clothianidin and Thiamethoxam on crops that affect bees: sunflowers, rapeseed, corn and cotton.

They also criticized the Environmental Protection Agency for ignoring its own research and for failing to hold big pharma’s feet to the fire in the original approval process for the pesticide.

Foraging bees get exposed to neonicotinoids by ingesting nectar and pollen from treated crops, and also through drifting dust in treated fields, according research published by the European Food Safety Authority in January.

The doses are typically not lethal, but accumulate in the bee. Studies by the EPA and the E.U. have long shown that extended exposure to neonicotinoids makes bees sluggish and ineffectual, but few controls were ever placed on specific compounds.

Neonicotinoids are widely used as a seed treatment in commercial agriculture, and are also sold over the counter as an insect treatment for trees, vegetables, fruits, ornamentals and flowers.

Nicotine has been used as a natural insecticide for centuries. Neuro-active neonicotinoids were developed in the 1980s as a low-toxicity alternative to conventional insecticides, safe on humans, pets and plants, but toxic to adult insects on ingestion, and, importantly, to larval insects on contact.

The new compounds quickly became the most widely used insecticides in the world. They currently enjoy almost universal use on industrial corn, “which blankets 88 million acres of farmland nationwide and produces a bounty of protein-rich pollen on which honeybees love to feast,” according to the environmental Website grist.org in a December, 2011 post by writer Tom Philpott.

Applied properly, neonicotinoids are highly effective against a wide variety of pests and provide an important tool in the war against the Western Bark Beetle, according to local arborist and tree pest specialist Chad Dykstra.

He acknowledges that the compounds have the potential to harm bees if not used properly, but argues that when properly applied by professionals, they’re safe to plants, pets, people and even bees.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

.

News

Downtown group coordinates painting, awnings

By Wendy Schultz | From Page: A1

 
More mountain lion sightings reported

By Dawn Hodson | From Page: A1, 8 Comments

 
Supervisor Nutting trial begins

By Cole Mayer | From Page: A1, 102 Comments | Gallery

Sanford murder case to jury

By Cole Mayer | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Herard over the back fence: Try fishing at Wakamatsu

By Bob Billingsley | From Page: B1

Gearing tax questions to correct office saves time

By Treasurer-Tax Collector | From Page: A3

 
.

Opinion

My turn: More than a buzzword

By Special to the Democrat | From Page: A4, 73 Comments

 
Building restored

By Mountain Democrat | From Page: A4

 
Outstanding dog

By Mountain Democrat | From Page: A4

.

Letters

‘Parents, be afraid’ letter

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A5, 53 Comments

 
Ukranian situation

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A5, 5 Comments

Misquote

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A5, 11 Comments

 
Altshuler framing

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A5, 9 Comments

National Day of Prayer

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A5, 7 Comments

 
.

Sports

Pedal power at the forefront next month

By Jerry Heinzer | From Page: A6 | Gallery

 
Outside with Charlie: Transitioning

By Charlie Ferris | From Page: A6

Pitching the ‘Root’ cause of Trojans’ victory

By Mike Bush | From Page: A6 | Gallery

 
Sports Scene: April 22, 2014

By Democrat Staff | From Page: A7

Roundup: April 22, 2014

By Democrat Staff | From Page: A7 | Gallery

 
.

Prospecting

4-H’ers star at showcase

By Dawn Hodson | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
At a glance: Look for fireballs

By Mimi Escabar | From Page: B2, 1 Comment

Authors to share their stories

By Pat Lakey | From Page: B2, 2 Comments

 
Church to host human trafficking conference

By Pollock Pines | From Page: B3

Grow For It! Flower of Easter

By Barbara Schuchart | From Page: B5

 
.

Essentials

Crime Log: April 1-3

By Cole Mayer | From Page: A2

 
Weather stats 4-22-14

By Michael Raffety | From Page: A2

Building permits 4/7-11/2014

By Michael Raffety | From Page: A2, 1 Comment

 
.

Obituaries

Bobby Lloyd Bridges

By Contributor | From Page: A2

 
Harry Frank Harper

By Contributor | From Page: A2, 6 Comments

Marion “Wayne” Griswold

By Contributor | From Page: A2

 
.

Real Estate

.

Comics

New York Times Crossword

By Contributor | From Page: A8

 
Flying McCoys

By Contributor | From Page: A8

Speed Bump

By Contributor | From Page: A8

 
Tundra

By Contributor | From Page: A8

Horoscope, Thursday, April 24, 2014

By Contributor | From Page: A8

 
Horoscope, Wednesday, April 23, 2014

By Contributor | From Page: A8

Working It Out

By Contributor | From Page: A8

 
TV Listings

By Contributor | From Page: A8

Shoe

By Contributor | From Page: A8

 
Sudoku

By Contributor | From Page: A8

Rubes

By Contributor | From Page: A8