Wednesday, April 16, 2014
PLACERVILLE, CALIFORNIA
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How to save water

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From page A4 | February 10, 2014 | 51 Comments

When the El Dorado Irrigation District asked its customers to reduce water use 30 percent many customers thought EID would be checking their meters and making a list of who’s naughty and nice. Put your mind at ease. That ain’t going to happen. No. 1, they only have enough staff to read them every other month. And if it snows in Pollock Pines any meters that aren’t remote transmitter replacements will get estimated.

The only way EID has of measuring water consumption on a daily basis is by how much water demand is placed on its water treatment plants. That is where the individual efforts to save water will show up as a collective total.

January, which was, hot and dry until Jan. 29-30 rain, set a record for water consumption districtwide. Demand for water from EID’s treatment plants shot up 27 percent above the three-year average.

For the record, the average daytime temperature recorded in January at our Ray Lawyer Drive weather station was 73.8 degrees Fahrenheit. That compares with the average of 58.1 degrees between 1999 and 2010 plus 2014 (We did not have a thermometer from 2012 to 2013 when PG&E suddenly stopped giving us temperature readings). The average overnight temperatures were more normal — 36.7 degrees.

That heat caused a lot of people to irrigate their landscaping in January.

Feb. 4 the EID board declared a Stage 2 Water Warning and the “Existence of an Emergency.” The declaration proved effective, since it rained overnight Feb. 5 and is expected to continue through Sunday.

February is cooler and with the rain, water consumption will drop significantly.

What the board is asking is that people voluntarily conserve. For those who already are conserving, try saving just a little bit more. For those who aren’t, achieving 30 percent water conservation is possible. One EID customer called us from Pollock Pines and wondered how he could save 30 percent since he didn’t have a lawn and didn’t have any outside landscaping to water. Obviously, that person is already conserving water. He just needs to find a few ways to reduce household water use.

Here are some tips from EID on how to save water. First off, EID will provide you with a low flow shower head and an aerator to attach to your water faucet. Low flow aerators on bathroom faucets will save 25 gallons per week. Low flow shower heads will save 210 gallons per week. If you are dedicated enough to take a Navy shower, you could easily double that. Navy showers while at sea mean wet yourself with the shower, then turn it off while you soap up, then turn it on again to rinse the soap off.

EID says changing the shower time from 10 minutes to five minutes for a three-person household will save 263 gallons a week.

Wash only full loads in the clothes washer to save 210 gallons a week (assuming seven loads a week).

Don’t leave water running while rinsing dishes to save 175 gallons a week.

Turn off the water when brushing your teeth (or shaving) and save 210 gallons a week in a three-person household.

Fix leaky faucets and leaky toilets and save 357 gallons between the two.

Finally, “Don’t use the toilet as a waste basket” and save 67 gallons a week in a three-person household.

Toilets use 1.6 gallons per flush. If you only flush for the brown stuff, you can add 1.6 gallons of water savings each time someone in your house goes tinkle and doesn’t flush. Figure that’s good for another 67 gallons a week.

Run the dishwasher only when full to save 13 gallons a week.

The total saving from EID’s suggestions are — including only filling the tub halfway for a bath — add up to 1,689 gallons of indoor use and that adds up to 15 percent savings on 1,500 cubic feet of water. That 1,500 cubic feet of water converts to 11,220 gallons of water. To save 30 percent of 1,500 cf will mean saving 3,336 gallons. That’s going to have to come from outside use. Consult a landscape artist who can convert your lawn to a Zen garden with raked gravel and some minimal xeriscape plantings (xeros is a Greek word for dry). For those with computers, Google xeriscape and look at all the photos of different xeriscape designs. They are pretty good looking, and, no, you don’t have to have gravel and cactus plants in your front yard like they do in Arizona.

We can all do our part. Some may hit the 30 percent mark, some 20 percent, some 15 percent, some less. It all depends on how much water you were using before and how much less you can use now. EID isn’t going to be looking at your bill. EID will just be looking at how much water is demanded at its water treatment plants.

You can find out how much water you have used in your current billing cycle compared to what you used in the same billing cycle a year ago by looking at the bar graph on the back of your bill.

Mountain Democrat

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | 51 comments

  • tunesFebruary 07, 2014 - 1:47 pm

    Another good way to water efficient is to save the water coming out of your tap waiting for hot water. I use a large tumbler at the bathroom sink and pitcher or bucket for the shower and kitchen sink. This water can be used for toilets or plants etc...

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  • cookie65February 10, 2014 - 5:13 am

    Using the faucet closest to the hot water heater for your hot water needs saves a lot of water.

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  • SqueakyCleanFebruary 10, 2014 - 9:46 am

    I know Cookie, I take my showers in the kitchen sink.

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  • Dink LaneFebruary 10, 2014 - 11:27 am

    According to Dept of Water Resources...1976-1977 (2nd driest) Precipitation total 17.1 inches by Oct 1 (When we would have normally 92%)...... the 1977 year we had LESS than this year's total by Oct 1, 2013 of 26.5 inches......... YET our lakes are far LOWER than 1977 levels..... WHY?....... Because the State shipped OVER 800,000 Acre-feet to the South ......... OVER what Kern-San Joaquin County FARMERS were contracted to get.......... You're going to hear a lot more about that 800,000 Acre-feet..... McClintock is fighting to give it to Kern County..... (Read/watch House floor on Feb 5 on argument FOR HR 3964) ....... McClintock wants to push that 800,000 ACRE FEET down south and leave YOU to ration your water .......PERMANENTLY.... I wish the blind Bobble-heads (Vote only R...don't think how you're getting ripped off.... just keep voting "R"....)..... Think People of El Dorado County.... Think....

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  • EvelynFebruary 10, 2014 - 12:20 pm

    SIMPLE, NON-SACRIFICIAL WATER SAVING (meaning, beats giving up my showers) -- kitchen garbage disposal units: I don't know how much water they use, but I don't use one. hand washing: cold water works and saves wasting a couple quarts of water during the warm-up process.

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  • cookie65February 11, 2014 - 4:24 am

    Eve!yn, this is actually what my comment was about. Not showering in the kitchen sink. My water heater is in the garage like many homes. One of my bathrooms is on the other side of the wall. The tub will deliver hot water in seconds. I can get hot water for dishes without loosing a drop down the drain. For cleaning, for what ever. The only time I ever use the disposal is when I am draining dirty dish water. I grew up on a well, we learned things the government nanny state know.

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  • Fran DuchampFebruary 10, 2014 - 12:31 pm

    Going to government, corporate, and university administration buildings...knocking on their doors...and pointing out that their vegetation is too green. <---pointed out down south during a drought 20+ years ago...oh and the utility companies.

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  • simple mathFebruary 10, 2014 - 12:47 pm

    save 30% in drought year? simple loophole...Just increase your water usage by 43% above what you need in the non-drought year so you can reduce 30% without impact to your vegetation or long showers.

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  • EvelynFebruary 10, 2014 - 12:56 pm

    simple math: There may be others like myself who, well before the declared drought, already had cut water consumption to the point that there's not much left to give up, other than showers and the like. With the advent of the City of Placerville's skyrocketing water rates, a couple years ago I ceased watering my yard and instituted other water conservation measures. If forced to cut back a further 30% I would have to take my laundry to the laundromat and rent a hotel room to shower.

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  • Mellow YellowFebruary 10, 2014 - 6:20 pm

    Evelyn, we put a large apple juice jug with a few drops of bleach and then filled with H20 into toity tank, so when we do flush it saves quite a bit. If it's yellow, keep it mellow............

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  • EvelynFebruary 10, 2014 - 6:37 pm

    MY: Great pseudonym!!! . . . and, useful tip. Thanks.

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 10, 2014 - 10:04 pm

    While cider jugs in toilet tanks may allow individuals the satisfaction of participating in water conservation all that good can be undone, canceled and reversed when individuals spread misinformation, disinformation and internet hocus pocus claptrap regarding GMOs. ~~~ LINK - Genuity DroughtGard Hybrids

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  • Mellow YellowFebruary 11, 2014 - 7:00 am

    I don't know about receiving “satisfaction” from water conservation, just a reduction in bill. But, really, Phill providing a link to Monsanto. Was that meant to be funny? And do you mean genetically ENGINEERED foods or just modified? Big difference as modified can occur freely in nature. Engineered is injecting Round-Up in DNA structure......... The real Monsanto........Vanity Fair

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 11, 2014 - 7:54 am

    Mellow Yellow, your assertion that Monsanto is, " injecting Round-Up in DNA structure", is a example of the kind of irresponsible disinformation to which I refer. Please substantiate your assertion that Round-Up is being injected into the DNA of corn, soybeans or ANY Monsanto GMO. The disinformation war against GMOs is not only disturbing it is deadly.

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  • EvelynFebruary 11, 2014 - 8:14 am

    "Roundup Ready Soybeans - What They Are And How They Work" - HERE: "Roundup Ready soybeans are tolerant to the herbicide Roundup because each soybean seed has the Roundup Ready gene injected into it through a seemingly complicated process. This process however is not as complicated as it sounds. The potential for the technology was discovered when a plant scientist first noticed a common garden flower (geranium) that was not killed by the herbicide Roundup. ... "

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  • Mellow YellowFebruary 11, 2014 - 9:02 am

    Phil, Glyphosate kills plants by interfering with the synthesis of the essential amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan. These amino acids are called "essential" because animals cannot make them; only plants and micro-organisms can make them and animals obtain them by eating plants.[1] Plants and microorganisms make these amino acids with an enzyme that only plants and lower organisms have, called 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS).[2] EPSPS is not present in animals, which instead obtain aromatic amino acids from their diet.[3] Roundup Ready Soybeans express a version of EPSPS from the CP4 strain of the bacteria, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, expression of which is regulated by an enhanced 35S promoter (E35S) from cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), a chloroplast transit peptide (CTP4) coding sequence from Petunia hybrida, and a nopaline synthase (nos 3') transcriptional termination element from Agrobacterium tumefaciens.[4] The plasmid with EPSPS and the other genetic elements mentioned above was inserted into soybean germplasm with a gene gun by scientists at Monsanto and Asgrow.

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  • Mellow YellowFebruary 11, 2014 - 9:47 am

    Phill, Bottom line, I care to only eat foods comprised of the molecular structure nature intended and what man has been eating for thousands of years. At least do you agree they inject this crap in DNA? Did you read my link (Vanity Fair)? I can give you countless others. I read yours. What about the seed hoarding and what Montanos is doing to small farmers? And, yes, I conceed, an unexpressed/expressed allele which is inherited is much different than a disease(HIV) which is communicable?????

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 11, 2014 - 11:56 am

    Mellow Yellow, you ask, " At least do you agree they inject this crap in DNA?" ~~~ No. I do not agree that they inject glyphosate into "Round-up Ready" GMOs. ~~~ ". . . The potential for the technology was discovered when a plant scientist first noticed a common garden flower (geranium) that was not killed by the herbicide Roundup. The scientist felt if he could identify the gene in the flower that enabled it to resist the herbicide, and then transfer that gene to a soybean plant, the soybean plant would then also become resistant to Roundup. ~~~ LINK - Roundup Ready Soybeans What They Are And How They Work

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  • EvelynFebruary 11, 2014 - 12:20 pm

    Phil: Thank you for using the link I posted @8:14 am. I note your excerpt begins AFTER this sentence: "Roundup Ready soybeans are tolerant to the herbicide Roundup because each soybean seed has the Roundup Ready gene injected into it through a seemingly complicated process."

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 11, 2014 - 12:34 pm

    Evelyn, the "magic" comes from GERANIUMS. The geranium gene that makes geraniums NATURALLY RESISTANT to glyphosate was identified, isolated and transplanted ("injected") into the soybean genes. It was the resistant gene that was transplanted. You seem to be a geranium hater. Even worse, you seem to be a geranium denier. A very strange "caper".

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 11, 2014 - 8:27 am

    Evelyn, a "Roundup Ready gene" IS NOT Roundup any more that a (for instance) an HIV ready gene would be HIV. The plant is given the ability to survive the herbicide which is applied MONTHS PRIOR to harvest and is undetectable in the harvested corn or beans.

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  • EvelynFebruary 11, 2014 - 9:04 am

    I understand that that a gene is not Roundup itself. As for the complexities of product history, one wouldn't expect to find much at Monsanto's own promotional website (your 10:04 pm link). HERE: "Study Links RR Corn to Tumors in Rats"

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 11, 2014 - 9:26 am

    Evelyn, the "study" you cite has been roundly rejected by rigorous inspection and review. It has become internet "fact by repetition". It is BOGUS pseudo-science. ~~~ LINK - Does genetically modified corn cause cancer? A flawed study fails to convince. But of course FORBES will be rejected because . . . well . . . it's FORBES.

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  • cookie65February 11, 2014 - 10:23 am

    Here we go again....

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  • Fran DuchampFebruary 11, 2014 - 8:29 am

    It is still creepy Phil...roundup?

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 11, 2014 - 8:44 am

    Fran, I would gently suggest (wrt roundup) that "creepy" is directly proportional to the amount of disinformation, misinformation and anti-roundup propaganda has been absorbed. The anti-GMO movement is a pernicious, dangerous and DEADLY campaign.

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  • Fran DuchampFebruary 11, 2014 - 9:26 am

    lolol..Phil, Good morning. I hadnt drank my coffee yet..."creepy" came to mind wrt: roundup. The previous owner next door used it on the weeds and ivy---the ivy has come back--but I always think of Halloween when i look at it. And I understand that roundup would not be in the seed. Now with some coffee in me--I will elevate the word to "icky." However , I do respect science. I really like the idea of Hydroponic Gardening--but everytime I bring it up...people think im going to start growing weed. shrugging shoulders.

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  • EvelynFebruary 11, 2014 - 9:44 am

    One week after the study's publication it was "rejected by rigorous inspection and review". Normally scientific inspection & review takes a bit longer.

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  • EvelynFebruary 11, 2014 - 10:06 am

    "Glyphosate’s Suppression of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes and Amino Acid Biosynthesis by the Gut Microbiome: PATHWAYS TO MODERN DISEASES" - HERE: " [G]lyphosate enhances the damaging effects of other food borne chemical residues and environmental toxins. Negative impact on the body is insidious and manifests slowly over time as inflammation damages cellular systems throughout the body."

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 11, 2014 - 10:29 am

    LINK - Peer Review – Where you thought it ended? That’s just the beginning! - GMO Compass - (The setting-up of this website was financially supported by the European Union ) ~~~ ". . . The authors refused to release the full description of materials and methods supposedly used in the study and falsely declared they had no conflicts of interest (despite the fact that funding was obtained, at least in part, by commercial entities that benefit from anti-GMO fears. . . ."

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 11, 2014 - 10:42 am

    Evelyn, your 10:06 am is relevant only to the ingestion of "Glyphosate". And therein lies an element of the dishonesty of the anti-GMO movement that is so, so maddening. Again, Glyphosate is applied very shortly after crop germination. It kills the weeds and virtually disappears by the time the crop is harvested. WE ARE NOT EATING Glyphosate. Your article suggests otherwise.

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  • Mellow YellowFebruary 11, 2014 - 11:50 am

    Phil Wiki: According to the National Pesticide Information Center fact sheet, Glyphosate is not included in compounds tested for by the Food and Drug Administration's Pesticide Residue Monitoring Program, nor in the United States Department of Agriculture's Pesticide Data Program, however a field test showed that lettuce, carrots, and barley contained glyphosate residues up to one year after the soil was treated with 3.71 pounds of glyphosate per acre.[20]

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 11, 2014 - 12:11 pm

    Mellow Yellow, I would postulate that the reason that, "Glyphosate is not included in compounds tested for by the Food and Drug Administration's Pesticide Residue Monitoring Program, is because glyphosate is NOT A PESTICIDE. Glyphosate is an HERBACIDE with a soil half life of 30 days. It does not "bio accumulate". GMOs contain virtually ZERO glyphosate.

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  • EvelynFebruary 11, 2014 - 12:34 pm

    HERBICIDE / PESTICIDE? A "Glycophosphate Technical Fact Sheet" is found at the National Pesticide Information Center - HERE

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 11, 2014 - 12:48 pm

    HERBICIDE / PESTICIDE? ~~~ the answer is irrelevant. GMO crops contain virtually ZERO glyphosate. Roundup ready seeds are not injected with glyphosate.

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  • Mellow YellowFebruary 11, 2014 - 1:51 pm

    Phil, keep postulating: According to the EPA a pesticide is defined as the following: •“A pesticide is any substance or mixture of substances intended for: Preventing, destroying, repelling, or mitigating any pest. •Though often misunderstood to refer only to insecticides, the term pesticide also applies to herbicides, fungicides, and various other substances used to control pests. •Under United States law, a pesticide is also any substance or mixture of substances intended for use as a plant regulator, defoliant, or desiccant.” - USEPA • As you can see, this is a very broad definition and applies to many more commonly used materials than most people believe.

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  • jodyFebruary 11, 2014 - 9:57 am

    fran, back in the early 80's my first hydroponic gardens included tomatoes, carrots(grew exceptional well), spinach, radishes, green leaf and romaine lettuce, bell peppers. google aquaponics for the latest advancements.

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  • Captain CarrotFebruary 11, 2014 - 10:03 am

    Phill, Can the overly dramatic....war............... …..deadly...........disturbing..........irresponsible...pernicious, dangerous, disinformation... crap. It diminishes rather than bolsters your position. Dang, did you graduate from the William Shatner school of overacting?

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 11, 2014 - 1:05 pm

    Captain Carrot, IMHO famine is "deadly...........disturbing..........irresponsible...pernicious, dangerous. . . ." ~~~ GMOs are a huge tool in feeding the world. . . . but . . . One of the drivers from academia against GMOs is a "first cousin" to the wisdom we see in our national parks, "Don't feed the animals". In other words, feeding more than what nature supports is not . . . uh . . . "sustainable". ~~~ If that is the argument then OK. In fact let's go one step further. Let's cease life saving interventions. Hungry? Tough luck. Injured? Tough luck. ~~~ But don't pollute the science with lies.

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  • Bitter MelonFebruary 11, 2014 - 1:32 pm

    Phil, I'm with you, Monsantos gets such a bad rap. I believe through their well known humanitarianism we will be rid of such malevolent inclinations. I mean, they've already brought us cool things like saccharin, polystyrene, PCB’s, DDT, Dioxin, Terminator seeds, rBGH, and agent orange. I trust 'em

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  • Mellow YellowFebruary 11, 2014 - 3:05 pm

    Phill, Dr. Don Huber is likely the leading GMO expert in the world. He is an award-winning, internationally recognized scientist, and professor of plant pathology at Purdue University for the past 35 years..... He states “There is simply no question and there is irrefutable evidence that genetic engineering is not the solution to feed a growing world population. Rather, it actually increases disease susceptibility of plants by impairing their immune response. It also reduces, not increases, yield potential. There’s never been a genetically engineered plant that increases the intrinsic yield of a plant. Improved plant yield is accomplished through traditional breeding programs that promote improved gene expression. “We’re only expressing 25 or 30 percent of the genetic potential for yield in any of our crops now,” Dr. Huber says. “There’s tremendous potential there. It’s a matter of using that traditional breeding as we’ve done for many years and getting better expression – not throwing in additional genes to act like a virus and disrupt the integrity of the whole process that’s required for yield and quality.................................. According to John Kempf,7 an Amish farmer and one of the leaders in the field of high-performance agriculture, farmers and food producers routinely harvest onlyabout 10 to 15 percent of the inherent genetic capacity of any given crop. In a nutshell, the foundation of health – whether we’re talking about plants, soils, animals, or people – it really boils down to two things1.Having adequate mineral nutrition, and 2.Having that nutrition, in the case of plants, be supplied by an active soil microbial community, or having a strong soil biology. Genetically engineered crops decimate both. How could it possibly be the answer to rising food demands? …..........................StarLink a GE corn, produced a protein that turned out to be very toxic to humans. StarLink was grown 10 years ago for a pharmaceutical process. It was pulled off the market when they realized it had escaped from its confines and had the ability to contaminate corn destined for food production.................Glyphosate is not “just” an herbicide. It was originally patented as a mineral chelator. It immobilizes nutrients, making them unavailable for your body. It’s also patented as a potent antibiotic that can devastate human gut bacteria

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  • You BetFebruary 11, 2014 - 4:28 pm

    Be like Phil and Only bathe every other week and wear the same clothes for several days...

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  • cookie65February 11, 2014 - 4:52 pm

    Good thing for you that you live in the 21st century. You could be insulting to your own ancestors. History didn't begin the day you were born.

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  • Oliver WendellFebruary 11, 2014 - 4:59 pm

    Monsanto is no friend of the farmer.

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 11, 2014 - 9:38 pm

    LINK - When Drought Strikes, Our Roots Run Deep DEKALB® Genuity® DroughtGard® Hybrids

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  • Phil VeerkampFebruary 13, 2014 - 8:18 am

    LINK - Food: Is Monsanto the answer or the problem?

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  • EvelynFebruary 17, 2014 - 9:34 am

    Genetic Fallacy: How Pesticide Companies Silence Scientific Dissent - HERE

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  • EvelynMarch 16, 2014 - 7:53 am

    Mellow Yellow: Are you still out there? DRAMATIC INCREASE IN KIDNEY DISEASE IN THE US AND ABROAD LINKED TO ROUNDUP (GLYPHOSATE) 'WEEDKILLER' - HERE

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  • EvelynMarch 16, 2014 - 6:29 pm

    Glyphosate, Hard Water and Nephrotoxic Metals: Are They the Culprits Behind the Epidemic of Chronic Kidney Disease of Unknown Etiology in Sri Lanka? HERE

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  • EvelynMarch 16, 2014 - 6:31 pm

    Sri Lanka bans Roundup and glyphosate herbicides to fight kidney disease epidemic - HERE

    Reply | Report abusive comment
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