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PLACERVILLE, CALIFORNIA
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More on Pearl Harbor

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November 2, 2010 | 19 Comments

EDITOR:

Letter writer Mr. Alger disputes my contention that Japan could have invaded the United States in World War II — noting that Japan was committed elsewhere and logistics would have prevented an invasion of the continental United States.

May I suggest that had Japan been successful in the Battle of Midway and in the Aleutian Islands, Hawaii would have been next giving Japan a perfect staging area for future operations against our West Coast. But they failed because we broke the Japanese codes, allowing us to read their mail and have the answers to the test.  Same as in Europe, where the Allies were successful in breaking the German codes.

Had we not broken the codes of Japan and Germany the outcome of WWII may well have been different, and we would be speaking Japanese west of the Mississippi and German east of the Mississippi.

JAMES E. LONGHOFER

Placerville

Letters to the Editor

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Discussion | 19 comments

  • James LonghoferNovember 02, 2010 - 10:26 am

    I thought this was previously published, but maybe not.

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  • MJCNovember 03, 2010 - 8:04 am

    The Japanese knew that U.S. citizens owned firearms. Documents show that the Japanese were VERY concerned about this.

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  • James LonghoferNovember 03, 2010 - 8:59 am

    What documents? Personal weapons against the might of the Japanese Army? Please.

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  • MJCNovember 03, 2010 - 9:03 am

    Oh james, you're still at it. Think of this: Why did the U.S. not want to invade Japan? Because WE knew that every man, woman and child would fight to the death with whatever they could pick up. Sound familiar to THIER concerns about our citizens with guns! James, you have a long history of dumb remarks; We chalk up another one with your last one.

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  • James LonghoferNovember 03, 2010 - 9:20 am

    MLC, good try, but the Japanese culture was total commitment to the state and their leader was considered a god. It was an honor to die for their god and many were prepared to do so armed only with sticks. The residents of California in the 40s, with their puny personal weapons, would have cut and run the second they were subjected to automatic weapons, artillery, and the bayonet. The 2nd Amendment gives us the right to personal weapons, but if you think for a moment you can stand up to the violence of an Army, you are grossly misinformed. America citizens with guns? Laughable.

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  • James LonghoferNovember 03, 2010 - 9:52 am

    Added. Sorry MJC. Even though our intelligence indicated the Japanese people were prepared to die armed only with sticks, stones, and personal weapons, our invasion would have gone forward if not for our atomic bombs. Any reluctance was not because of the Japanese people using puny weapons, but for our reluctance to having to kill school girls armed with sticks. A bloodbath. Without our atomic bombs convincing the Japanese to surrender, the invasion would have proceeded and sadly the bloodbath would have occurred.

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  • Ed.boyNovember 03, 2010 - 10:06 am

    ya... what documents? cripes. are you serious? hilarious.

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  • Kirk MacKenzieNovember 03, 2010 - 4:11 pm

    Mr Longhoffer -- you scoff at the idea of Americans armed with personal weapons fighting effectively against the Japanese army. And that they would have cut and run in the face of said army. This is all academic speculation. True, they probably would not have done well taking them head on, but they would have been a significant force in guerilla form, as is usually the case in such a situation.

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  • MJCNovember 03, 2010 - 5:35 pm

    Don't reply to JL anymore. He has a long history with Letters to the Editor. His long history has shown him to be GROSSLY one sided, leftist and whimpy. He's a fool and does not deserve any response.

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  • James LonghoferNovember 03, 2010 - 5:53 pm

    Mr. MacKenzie, I don't know. Our last experience of Americans engaging in guerilla warfare in the continental United States was during the Civil War. I think we were then a more hearty people. Are we still up it to or have we gone soft? I see these manly Tea Party types wearing their pistols in public, and to me they don't look like they could live in the woods being hunted by the Japanese (or U.S. forces if they were in revolt) without TV, showers, three meals a day with a dessert later, coffee from Starbucks, and then clean sheets with an electric blanket. However, you may be right and our 2nd Amendment types might, then or now, harrass the heck out of U.S. forces or the Japanese (tough vicious soldiers as Marines who served at Tarawa, Guadalcanal;, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa will attest), but I don't have much faith in their chances to survive as any kind of fighting force. Soon decimated. And remember, the original comment was that the Japanese were very concerned because Americans had personal weapons. Here's some academic speculation: The Japanese fleet lies off the coast of California and is preparing to land troops. The Admiral is about to give the order Land The Landing Craft (one of the few Navy terms I know). Just then he receives intelligence that American civilians have personal weapons. He throws up his hands and gives the order for his fleet (warships and troop ships) to head back to Japan, as there is no way he is foolish enough to attack Americans with personal weapons. I think the problem may be that unless you were alive during WWII you don't have a sense of the Japanese as an enemy. An enemy that had to be defeated at sea and dug out (with horrendous losses) of a long string of islands leading to Japan. Simply, they didn't have fear of personal weapons in the hands of civilians. Therefore, I do scoff at the idea that the Japanese would have been concerned about American civilians having personal weapons. To think they would have been is ludicrous.

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  • James LonghoferNovember 03, 2010 - 5:54 pm

    MJC, your fear is showing.

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  • Kirk MacKenzieNovember 03, 2010 - 8:46 pm

    MJC -- your order is noted and duly filed in the circular recepticle next to the used gum wrappers.

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  • Kirk MacKenzieNovember 03, 2010 - 8:55 pm

    Mr Loghoffer -- let's stick to the 1940s version of Americans. I agree with your assesment of most of the current day variety, but even then I am a great believer in adaptation by humans. The 1940s version may be decimated, but the 9/10s left would put up a serious threat to any invading force, even the formidable Japanese combat troops. If we are going to play that hypothetical game it is important to imagine just how thinly spread they would be at that point. Any invader that did not fear an armed (and better armed with captured weapons plus supplies and reinforcements from the military) populace defending their homeland is destined for failure. I do not expect their commanders would hesitate to order the assault -- they had not encountered anything like what we are talking about before -- but I think they would have failed in the long run.

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  • James LonghoferNovember 03, 2010 - 9:06 pm

    Mr. MacKenzie, this whimpy (sic) debater thanks you. Without debate we are lost. Conservative, liberal, right, wrong, agree or disagree. When we stop talking to each other, progress is impossible.

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  • Kirk MacKenzieNovember 03, 2010 - 9:59 pm

    Mr Longhoffer -- agreed.

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  • MJCNovember 04, 2010 - 10:29 am

    Too bad what JL says is divel 99% of the time. Need to put on way-back time warping glasses to be in his world

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  • James LonghoferNovember 04, 2010 - 10:34 am

    MJC, it's called the experience of age. You'll be smart when you get old too.

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  • MJCNovember 04, 2010 - 10:44 am

    Sorry, you long history of rank postings to the M.Demo. tells your story. Bye.

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  • James LonghoferNovember 04, 2010 - 10:54 am

    MJC, if you don't like them, don't read them. How come we never read your letters in the Mt.Democrat?

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