PLACERVILLE, CALIFORNIA

Prospecting

Foothill gourmet: Time to get corny

By From page B2 | August 12, 2013

Donna BrownSweet summer corn is ready to give all its flavor right now. Buy enough ears for all family members and serve it up one of the following different ways. Steaming and grilling is a time tried favorite way of preparing corn. Of course, fresh has more flavor but frozen will work when fresh is no longer available.

One 10-ounce package of frozen corn equals 2 cups kernels or 4 ears fresh corn. That’s important information — write it down in your go-to cookbook. The times when you don’t have fresh corn, you can substitute an equivalent amount of frozen corn using the frozen corn/fresh corn relationship stated above in corn recipes.

The following recipes are designed to give your corn an upbeat flavor.

Thai corn salad — Whisk 1/2 cup coconut milk, 2 tablespoons lime juice, 1/2 tablespoon fish sauce, a pinch of cayenne and salt. Toss with 6 cups mixed greens, 1 1/2 cups cooked or frozen corn, 1/2 cup shredded carrots, 1/2 cup diced red bell peppers and 1/4 cup chopped fresh mint. Serves three to four people. If you’re serving fewer people, measure out one or two salad bowls of greens. Use just a portion of the Thai sauce, saving the rest for another day.

Southwestern corn salad — Whisk 1/4 cup olive oil, 2 tablespoons lime juice, 1 teaspoon cumin, a pinch of cayenne (optional) and 3/4 teaspoon salt. Toss with 2 1/2 cups cooked corn, 2 cups black beans, 1 cup diced roasted red peppers, 2 cups chopped tomatoes and 1/4 cup fresh cilantro chopped. Top with 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese.

Curried corn soup — Sauté 1 chopped onion in 1 tablespoon of Canola oil over medium high heat in a large saucepan for 3 minutes. Stir in 1 tablespoon curry powder and cook 1 minute, continue stirring so the curry powder is well mixed. Add 5 cups vegetable or chicken broth, 3 cups corn, 1 1/2 cups diced potato and 1 tablespoon lemon juice. Season with salt. Increase heat to high and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until potatoes are tender about 20 minutes. Purée soup in batches in a blender or food processor. Take care when blending hot liquids. Stir in 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro and add more salt and curry powder to taste. Serve with diced plum tomatoes and plain Greek yogurt.

Chilled corn soup — Sauté 1 diced onion in 1 tablespoon Canola oil over medium heat in a large saucepan for 3 minutes. Add 1/2 cup canned chopped green chiles and 1 minced garlic clove. Cook 2 minutes. Add 1 teaspoon each coriander and cumin and cook 3 minutes. Add 2 1/2 cups corn. Cook 5 minutes. Transfer 1 1/2 cups corn mixture to a blender. Purée with 2 cups buttermilk. Transfer to a bowl. Add remaining corn mixture and 2 more cups buttermilk. Season with salt. Chill, serve topped with chopped fresh parsley or chives.

Corn casserole — Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mist a baking dish with cooking spray. Mix 2 cups corn, 1/2 cup heavy cream, 1/4 cup milk, 2 beaten eggs, 3/4 cup grated cheddar and salt in a bowl. Pour into prepared dish. Set dish in a large baking dish. Pour 1 inch water into larger dish. Bake until center is just set, about 30 minutes.

Quiche — Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Fit a 9-inch pie plate with pie dough. Line with foil and weight with dried beans. Bake 10 minutes. Discard foil and beans. Reduce heat to 300 degrees. Mix 4 slices cooked crumbled bacon, 1/2 cup corn, 1 cup grated jack cheese, 4 beaten eggs, 2 cups heavy cream and salt in a bowl. Pour into shell. Bake 40 minutes. Let quiche rest 5-10 minutes for easier slicing.

Enjoy summer corn in a variety of recipes.

Donna Brown

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