Friday, July 25, 2014
PLACERVILLE, CALIFORNIA
99 CENTS

Ned Carnett: ‘No. 1 in the No. 2 business’

KMK_0111 ec

THE CARNETT FAMILY, from left to right are Ned, Steven and Delores as they pose in their truck yard for their septic tank business based in Placerville for 40 years. Democrat photo by Krysten kellum

By
From page SOS17 | December 31, 2012 |

 “They keep telling us to raise our prices,” said Ned Carnett, 69, owner of Ned Carnett Septic Services located on Union Ridge Road in Placerville. “If you bring up your price, your profit margin is higher. But we don’t look at it as, ‘We’re going to make so much money for this job.’ We have an obligation to our customers.”

As with many local businesses, Ned Carnett Septic Services has felt the crunch of recent economic times. From lawn care to cleaning air-conditioning filters, local homeowners have a lot to worry about. Unfortunately, when times are tough, maintaining their septic systems often gets placed at the bottom of the list.

“The housing market dropped and the phone stopped ringing. We lost 50 percent of our business,” said Delores Carnett, 65, Ned’s wife and partner in the business. “We had to lower our prices in the hopes of getting more jobs. People were even trying to do the jobs themselves.”

But Ned and Delores, along with their son and partner, Steven, 42, know how important it is to maintain a septic system properly. A septic system is an underground tank with two compartments — a solid side and a wastewater side — where sewage is stored and decomposed by anaerobic bacteria. In a healthy system, as sewage flows into the tank, solids settle into one side while wastewater flows to the other. The solids are stored until they break down or are removed. The wastewater is purified by enzymes in the tank and then gradually released to a “leach field,” an area of land — usually “a ditch covered with gravel ”— where final treatment occurs in the soil.

Unfortunately, not all waste can be decomposed by the bacteria in a septic tank. Over time, the solids build up and must periodically be pumped out. Otherwise, they can flow into the wastewater side, causing system failure and contamination of the leach field. In addition, moist toilettes, even those that manufacturers mark “flushable,” don’t break down. This is where Ned and Steven come in.

“Depending on how you use it, most tanks need to be pumped every three to five years,” said Steven. “We try to determine what our customers’ needs really are and work them there. We’ll try to talk customers out of a job if they don’t really need it.”

Ned agreed. “If you’re out there trying to talk them out of a job, they’ll talk themselves into it. It’s all about how you treat people. If you’re sincere and really try to help customers, they recognize that.”

Genuine care is just one of the things customers can count when dealing with Ned Carnett Septic Services. Ned has been in the business since he built his first septic truck more than 40 years ago, and since then it’s been a business where everyone, including the customers, is family.

“Because we’ve been here and been in the same location for a long time, we get a lot of repeat customers. We have more experience than anyone by far, and we’re not just sending anyone out there to help you,” said Ned. “I had a lady call me the other day who I hadn’t helped in 40 years, but, still, she remembered me.”

Steven laughed and agreed. “People tell me all the time, ‘I thought your dad was going to come . . .’”

In addition to residential septic tank inspections and pumps, Ned Carnett Septic Services performs septic inspections for real estate transactions and refinancing homes. It’s just one more way Ned Carnett Septic Services demonstrates that they care, and a secret to the company’s success over the years.

“We have a quick response time and treat our customers like friends,” said Delores. “We’re nice to people and are committed to keep prices low when times are like they are now. We offer expert advice and, if we’ve ever been able to help you, we’ll be here when you need us again.”

Comments

comments

Jessica Cyphers

.

News

 
Scaffolding issue makes for contentious meeting

By Wendy Schultz | From Page: A1, 1 Comment | Gallery

District 2: Candidates debate jobs versus lifestyle

By Dawn Hodson | From Page: A1, 1 Comment | Gallery

 
Accident: 1 bullet hits 2

By Cole Mayer | From Page: A1

 
Help available for breastfeeding mothers

By Health and Human Services Agency | From Page: A3

 
El Dorado County School Board vacancy

By El Dorado County Office of Education | From Page: A8

 
.

Opinion

The weekly Daley: A good time to be there…

By Chris Daley | From Page: A4

 
Something to think about: More than what you see

By Wendy Schultz | From Page: A4

Popular science

By Mountain Democrat | From Page: A4

 
.

Letters

Bureaucracy

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A5, 1 Comment

 
Imagination Theater’s play

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A5

Watch whom you’re calling ‘conservative’

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A5Comments are off for this post

 
Fake ‘small farms’ steal from residential EID customers

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A5Comments are off for this post

People of Placerville

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A5

 
Computer scam phone calls

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A5

Support of Director Prada

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A5

 
Uphold the Third Amendment

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A5

.

Sports

Sports Scene: July 24, 2014

By Democrat Staff | From Page: A6

 
Quarter century later, Rypien wins ACCG again

By Andrew Hazard | From Page: A6 | Gallery

Outside with Charlie: Paddle time

By Charlie Ferris | From Page: A6

 
Midget Lites join tomorrow’s action

By Bill Sullivan | From Page: A6

El Dorado rallies for last-inning victory

By Mike Bush | From Page: A6

 
Rush sit a win from Series

By Jerry Heinzer | From Page: A7

Tasmanian Devils go undefeated

By Patty Pope | From Page: A7

 
.

Prospecting

El Dorado wines win in Amador

By Democrat Staff | From Page: B1

 
Suds entice the taste buds

By Krysten Kellum | From Page: B2 | Gallery

Things to do: July 25, 2014

By Democrat Calendar | From Page: B2

 
Rhythm and Views goes bluesy

By | From Page: B3

Have an Hawaiian vacation at Carson Road wineries

By Carson Road Winery Asociation | From Page: B3Comments are off for this post | Gallery

 
Summer fun is happening in Twain Harte

By Fire On | From Page: B4Comments are off for this post

Manzanita doubles the music

By Table Nectar And Manzanita | From Page: B5

 
Recording artist at Busby Cellars

By News Release | From Page: B6

Hands4Hope hosts school supply drive

By News Release | From Page: B6

 
Supergroup plays Harris Center

By Carrera Productions | From Page: B6

Visit Tahoe artists during tour

By Special to the Democrat | From Page: B7

 
Reggae on the River celebrates 30 years

By Reggae On | From Page: B7Comments are off for this post

Artists invited to go western

By Art On The Divide | From Page: B7

 
.

Essentials

Lake levels 7-24-14

By Michael Raffety | From Page: A2

 
Crime Log: July 11-13

By Cole Mayer | From Page: A2

Building permits 7/7-11/2014

By Michael Raffety | From Page: A2

 
.

Obituaries

Wallace Murrel Thomas

By Contributor | From Page: A2

 
.

Real Estate

How to have a garden party, minus the whining

By Marni Jameson | From Page: HS3

 
Most common mistakes homebuyers make

By Ken Calhoon | From Page: HS4

.

Comics

Tundra

By Contributor | From Page: A9

 
Working It Out

By Contributor | From Page: A9

Shoe

By Contributor | From Page: A9

 
Sudoku

By Contributor | From Page: A9

Rubes

By Contributor | From Page: A9

 
TV Listings

By Contributor | From Page: A9

Speed Bump

By Contributor | From Page: A9

 
New York Times Crossword

By Contributor | From Page: A10

Horoscope, Sunday, July 27, 2014

By Contributor | From Page: A10

 
Horoscope, Saturday, July 26, 2014

By Contributor | From Page: A10

Horoscope, Friday, July 25, 2014

By Contributor | From Page: A10

 
.

Home Source

How to have a garden party, minus the whining

By Marni Jameson | From Page: HS3

Most common mistakes homebuyers make

By Ken Calhoon | From Page: HS4